Adderall: Candy for College Students

Adderall

We often hear about performance enhancing drugs and think of steroid use in sports; however, there is an increasing movement on college campuses. Students are abusing so called, “smart drugs.” Some are using them to improve study sessions and prepare for final exams.

We often hear about performance enhancing drugs and think of steroid use in sports; however, there is an increasing movement on college campuses. Students are abusing so called, “smart drugs.” With finals right around the corner, some are using them to improve study sessions and prepare for final exams.

The benefits of Adderall can be striking to a college student who is under pressure to succeed in the classroom and meet deadlines. Adderall is an amphetamine prescribed to children and adults with attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD). The drug can improve concentration, increase motivation, and intensify attentiveness vital to college customs such as all-nighters and cramming for an exam.

Greg Graven isn’t the average college student. He wakes up early every day to work with the university hockey team as the equipment manager. Along with a full-time job and heavy class load Graven has little time to do his school work. This is why he takes Adderall.

“I can get 6 hours of assignments done is 2 hours,” Graven said.

However, Graven doesn’t have a prescription for Adderall.

“It’s easy to get and I have friends who will give it to me for cheap,” said Graven.

adderall addiction

He’s not the only one participating in this action. Alan DeSantis, a researcher at the University of Kentucky found that 30 percent of students at the university have illegally used a stimulant such as Adderall or Ritalin

Many people who are not prescribed the drug do not realize the harmful side effects it can cause. Side effects include nervousness, restlessness, dizziness, headache, dry mouth, anxiety, along with raised blood pressure and increased heart rate.

bby Born is prescribed Adderall for her ADHD. She takes one 30 mg capsule every morning with her coffee and bagel. “I can’t start my day without it,” Born said. She takes her pill and a half hour later, she’s ready to conquer her day.

“Without my Adderall my mind travels a million miles a minute. No matter how hard I try to concentrate in class every little thing distracts me.”

A study conducted by Brigham Young University investigated the usage of Adderall over Twitter.

“Adderall pills are the most abused prescription drug among university students,” said lead researcher Carl Hanson, a professor of health science at BYU. The study concluded over 200,000 tweets from nearly 100,000 users. An average of 930 tweets per day mentioned the drug. The study found Adderall tweets severely peaked during usual finals times. The most tweets were reported on December 13 (2,813) and April 30 (2,207).

The Twitter study also revealed that “9 percent of Adderall tweets mentioned another substance, with the most common two being alcohol (4.8 percent) and stimulants like coffee or Red Bull (4.7 percent)” (Hollingshead)

There are several Twitter accounts mocking how students act while under the influence of Adderall. One account named “Adderall Had Me” has nearly 230,000 followers and almost 1,000 tweets. Most of the tweets are in a joking manner when in reality the side effects of this drug should be taken seriously.